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Archive for the ‘Quotes’ Category

“In eternity this world will be Troy, I believe, and all that has passed here will be the epic of the universe, the ballad they sing in the streets. Because I don’t imagine any reality putting this one in the shade entirely, and I think piety forbids me to try.” (p. 57)

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“His friends were so worried about his low mood that they feared he was suicidal, took all knives and razors from his room. And Joshua Speed went to his side and said, “Lincoln, if you don’t rally, you will die.” Lincoln said, “I would just as soon die now, but I haven’t yet done anything to make any human being remember that I have lived.” And then he espoused that dream that would carry him, saying that, “My goal in life is to accomplish something that makes life better for those who live around me so that I can be remembered after I die.”  

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“In 1908 Tolstoy was interviewed by The New York World and he told this amazing story of having gone to a remote area of the Caucuses some years prior to that, where he encountered a whole bunch of wild barbarians who had never left this area of Russia. And they were so excited that Tolstoy was there, they asked him to tell great stories of the men of the west. So Tolstoy said I told them all about Napoleon and Frederick the Great and Alexander and they were loving every moment of it. But before I finished, theyhad stopped him and said, “But wait. You haven’t told us about the greatest ruler of them all. We want to hear about that man who spoke with a voice of thunder, who laughed like the sunrise. That man who comes from that place called America, which is so far from here, that if a young man should travel there, he would be anold man when he arrived. Tell us of that man. Tell us of Abraham Lincoln. ”Tolstoy was stunned that they had heard of Lincoln and he told him everything heknew about his difficult upbringing, his move through politics and the Emancipation Proclamation. And then he asked himself, so what was it about Lincoln that made him greater than these other rulers? Not a great statesmen like Frederick the Great, not a great General like Napoleon. But he said, “His greatness consisted in the character of his being and the moral fiber of his being.” And Ithink for generations historians would agree with that understanding.”

Abraham Lincoln cited in Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Team of Rivals

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Bruce McCormack“Barth’s ‘moral ontology’ ascribes more freedom and significance to the human than do the anthropological underpinnings of the ‘moral Cartesianism’ (p. 55) which has tended to dominate modern ethical reflection. On the latter view, the human subject is self-positing in a non-dependent, unqualified way. The subject creates her ‘self’ through setting and accomplishing ethical goals in the face of moral quandaries. A divine agency whose existence would qualify or determine such finite acts of self determination is seen, on this view, as hostile to human freedom. For Barth, such an understanding offers only the appearance of freedom. (more…)

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Schleiermacher“Protestantism makes the individual’s relation to the Church dependent on his relation to Christ, while Catholicism contrariwise makes the individual’s relation to Christ dependent on his relation to the Church.”

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Barth“The content of the Bible, and the object of its witness, is Jesus Christ as the name of the God who deals graciously with man the sinner.  To heed and understand its witness is to realize the fact that the relation between God and man is such that God is gracious to man: to man who needs Him, who as a sinner is thrown wholly upon God’s grace, who cannot earn God’s grace, and for whom it is indissolubly connected with God’s gracious action towards him, for whom therefore it is decisively one with the name of Jesus Christ as the name of the God who acts graciously towards him.  (more…)

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